The cheapest house in Toronto isn’t real

What the blockchains hath bought

The first NFT digital house in the world, Mars House by Toronto artist Krista Kim, sold for more than $600,000 Canadian. The deal received enough press attention to make anyone wonder if it marks the peak of the three-week-old craze concerning non-fungible tokens. After all, Pizza Hut Canada has already taken a bite out of the trend.


Life in #AlabamaOfTheNorth

University of Ottawa professor Amir Attaran found a fan of his tweeting in NDP MP Matthew Green, which led Jagmeet Singh to clarify that calling Quebec racist isn’t a party position. Meanwhile, the leader of the Bloc Québécois thinks students from the province should reconsider attending U of O due to Attaran’s persistence on Twitter.


I’m the leader. I’m in charge.” Erin O’Toole affirmed the Conservatives will present a plan to address climate change, even though federal party members voted down a resolution to acknowledge its existence—just before the Supreme Court rules on the constitutionality of carbon taxes. The issue has stoked criticism of his leadership ability.


The cloudy days after retiring

CTV Ottawa honoured the departure of longtime weatherman J.J. Clarke last May, even though he’d already been off the air for two years due to health issues. But now he’s on the front page of the Ottawa Citizen after being charged with seven counts of harassment against three people. Clarke talks about the struggles in retirement while aspiring to clear his name:


Martin Scorsese isn’t returning calls from Melonville. As the director keeps adding new credits, there’s no release of his work on An Afternoon with SCTV, shot in Toronto on May 13, 2018. But headlines involving Rick Moranis have notably increased since that reunion, recently due to how his Spaceballs character resembled a Capitol rioter.


Finally, the framing of Fanny

Fanny: The Right to Rock was announced as one of the premieres from Hot Docs, which will have its second turn as a home viewing festival via Toronto. Montreal-based filmmaker Bobbi Jo Hart lensed the story of the Millington sisters, who moved from the Philippines to California and started an all-female rock band that was almost famous: