Doug Ford in headlines like the Before Times

Oh thank heaven for 7-Eleven

“It’s like listening to nails on a chalkboard, listening to you,” said Doug Ford to Andrea Horwath, who criticized his lifting of COVID-19 restrictions, and the premier won’t abide by the NDP leader’s apology call. Meanwhile, it turns out 7-Eleven’s alcohol ambitions in Ontario were preceded by Ford paying a visit to the corporate HQ in Texas.


The discount empire of Roman

After the MPP kicked out of caucus for opposing Doug Ford’s lockdown measures introduced a bill to slash legislature salaries to CERB levels, a motion was introduced to exclusively cut the pay of Roman Baber. After that was ruled out of order, Baber declared the trolling another example of the Ontario PCs being COVID-19 bullies.


The judge who was presiding over a Toronto court from the Turks and Caicos. Video sessions conducted from a Caribbean beachfront were a mistake, according to the office of Ontario’s chief justice, which said the judge’s winter trip was justified for confidential reasons. But the public service employees union called for her termination.


The days of clickbait diplomacy

Google cutting deals with news publishers to circumvent laws forcing them to pay for linking news was followed by Facebook restricting journalism shares in Australia, which also means Sydney-based Quillette had its page wiped. Canada’s media industry is now standing by for parallel dramatics:


And when a team you’re playing is flat, that’s when you gotta put a boot on their throat and put your full body weight on it. Brian Burke’s words during a Stanley Cup playoffs broadcast led to a complaint about the now former commentator. After a review, the Canadian Broadcast Standards Council ruled that the phrasing glamorized violence.


Finally, making of a movie deal

The Guide to the Perfect Family is the English title of a dramedy about the over-parenting of society, slated for a summer theatrical release. But instead of being another French flick all but invisible to the rest of Canada, it follows The Decline as a Quebec feature picked up by Netflix, as a reflection of more investment in this land: